Where are the limits of human technology? And can we somehow avoid them? This is where quantum computers become very interesting. Check out THE NOVA PROJECT to learn more about dark energy: Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff: Get the music of the video here: Wakelet: Or follow us on social media or reddit: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tamago231, H.H. Lewis, Kirin Tantinon, David, Max Lesterhuis, Marek Belski, Gisle, Colin Millions, Gregory Wolfe II, Lenoir Preminger, Abel X, Matt Knights, Amjad Al Taleb, Ian Bruce, Kris Wolfgramm, 麒麟 于, Christopher Shaw, 靖羊, Tomas Grolmus, Essena O’Neill, Kyle Messner, Pedro Devoto, Mark Radford, Ann-Marie Denham, Davide Pluda, Rik Vermeer, Justin Ritchie, Nicole White, Whireds, Claus Vallø, Jason Talley, Andrew Wu, Christian Dechery, Michael Howell, Michal Hanus, Cavit, Amary Wenger, JDKBot, Jason Eads, FreedomEagleAmerica, Roberto Maddaloni, TiagoF11, Harsha CS, Abhimanyu Yadav, Tracy Tobkin, Mike Fuchs, Elizabeth Mart, Jacob Wenger, Jeff Udall, Ricardo Affonso, Mauro Boffardi, Audrin Navarro, Troy Ross, Keith Tims, Santiago Perez, James, Jack Devlin, Chris Peters, Kenny Martin, Frederick Pickering, Lena Savelyeva, Ian Seale, Charles Ju, Brett Haugen, David Ramsey, Benjamin Dittes, Michelle Schoen, Albert Harguindey Sanchez, Michael King, Alex Kyriacou Alla Khvatova Thomas Rowan, Siim Sillamaa, David Bennell, Janzen,Bryn Farnsworth, Adam Recvlohe, Manuel Arredondo, Fred McIntyre, Maldock Manrique, Дмитрий, Ishita Bisht, Jake Ludwig, Zach Seggie, Casey Sloan, Myndert Papenhuyzen, rheingold3, AncientCulture, Orion Mondragon, Jan, Michael Kuperman, Alexander Argyropoulos Quantum Computers Explained – Limits of Human Technology Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: Beginning around 1377, medieval England was shaken by a power struggle between two noble families, which spanned generations and involved a massive cast of characters, complex motives and shifting loyalties. Sound familiar? Alex Gendler illustrates how the historical conflict known as the Wars of the Roses served as the basis for much of the drama in Game of Thrones. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Brett Underhill.


View full lesson: It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by TED-Ed.


View full lesson: Imagine going about your life knowing that, at any given moment, you and everyone you know could be wiped out without warning at the push of a button. This was the reality for millions of people during the forty-five year period after World War II now known as the Cold War. Matthew A. Jordan explains the history behind the peak of all this panic — the thirteen days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Lesson by Mathew A. Jordan, animation by Patrick Smith.


Size is the most under appreciated regulators of living things. Let us demonstrate that by throwing animals from buildings. Kurzgesagt Newsletter: Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: The music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tommy Palm, Rob Kay, Krystian Jagoda, Nathaniel Caza, Ing Apilitkitsmai, Felix Nilsson, Andrew Czarnietzki, Curtis Light, Shalay Hudson, Devin Harris, Sascha Holste, Garret Robinson, Eric Korhonen, Ivy McLeod, Jonathan Smithson, Kristin Wolff, Bram Vandenbogae, Dane Shea, Jean Rossi, Tom Hoy, Nick, Luke Chromy, Benjamin Rich, Florian Wilke, Nomubiku, Brad Gordon, Alec Wassill, Andrew Ferrell, André Campos, Andrea Stiffelman, Annette Allen, Luke England, Quique Bengochea, Mikael Linderholm, Robin Fernandes, Gabriel Marante, Jonathan Kelly, Christian Frinken, JD Manuel, Simon Naus, Matthew Remillard, James Camidge, Joao Neves, Brenton Doherty, Janet Low, Lucy Zhang, Harry Kingsley, Allan Lazo, Aleksandar Milanov, Lennart Hensler, John P., zjweele13, Simon Strandgaard, Owen, Drake Hardy, Harry Dong, Lci larocci, Graham Shumway, Jona Derks, David Matlock, Hans Wurst, Steven Boliek, Paul Chensy, Philip Preston, Daniel Du, Oskuro, Mark Simonson, Mārtiņš Zinbergs. Dylan Mason, Cameron Stewart, Joanne Chou, Andrew O’Neill, Ramsay Kamal, Dani Rabinowitz, Vlad Zinchenko, Dennis Kaur, Benjamin Davis, Waltimus Prime, Daniele A. muchtas, Matt Randall, Ani, Quintc, Eugene Zingerman, Stephen Collis, Kevin Keogh, Scott Stevens, John Cantwell, Marcin Lepczyk, Jannik Wagner, John Tschampel, David, Augusto, Mike Rotondo, Matthew Leibowitz, Martin Gauer, ShiroKuma, William Closson, Jeff Cerminar, Marc Kuiper, Samuel Choy, Per Opedal, Oddysen, TJ, Váradi Bence, Marcie Shepherd, Ken Rutabana, Roman Rys, Chase Reynolds, Nathan Skirrow, Charles Mowers, Brandon Lane, Mitch Haggman, Patrick Nobl, vladimir šebez, Nicholas Evers, David Hirsch, Misko Giboreau, Friedrich Reider, Christian Massold, Björn Keßel, Ron Leonard, Johann Goergen, Tonina Zhelyazkova, Tony Nitowski, Geoffrey Major, William Bonwitt, Arslan Ablikim, James Tran, JP Hastings-Spital, Michael Shi, Anni Gill, Cymon Carlisle, bob smith, Jonathan Brunette, George Murray, John, Bryan Lawlor, Bjarne Kohnke, Christopher Isar, Renee Undrits, Joshua Hardin, Diego, Maggs, Akram Jamal-Allail, shoftee, Dattu Patel, Josh Heri, Christopher Dein DeltaNutmeg, Julian Hartline, Jesper Sølvsten, Adam Thompson, Amadon Faul, Ben Spicer, Dan-Dumitru Donici, Kaushik Narasimhan, Dennis Kok, Carlo Fajardo, Zaneksy, Rami Najjar, Rik Muschamp, César Rdez, David Marsden, Klasoweit, Gabrielle Gendron-Lepage, Nicholas, Nathan Dietrich, Manolo Calderon, Gil Nemesh, Caleb, Karthik Sekar, Jean-Francois Blain, Travis Harger, Jose Zamora, Danilo Metzger, Olle Karlberg, TJ, Patrick Hart, SCPNostalgia, Devin, David Oxley, Andy Hill, Maxime Cony, Vjenceslav, Neil Mukhopadhyay, Cory Bosse, Kara M., Dogydogsun, Andy Zeng, Angela Flierman, Tyler Alden, Klaus Prünster, Alex Boyd, Diana Martínez, Danny Fast, Bryce Watson, Chan Maneesilasan, Johanna Lind, Orphansmith, 彥霖 陳, Emanuel Hafner, James Dominguez, Kevin Hackbarth, Pablo Pagano, Liam Quin, Dan Rossiter, James Phan, Leon Klang, Romain Isnel, Anthony Eales, Freebite, Logan Rankin, Udi Eylat Help us caption & translate this video! What Happens If We Throw an Elephant From a Skyscraper? Life & Size 1


View full lesson: Narcissism isn’t just a personality type that shows up in advice columns; it’s actually a set of traits classified and studied by psychologists. But what causes it? And can narcissists improve on their negative traits? W. Keith Campbell describes the psychology behind the elevated and sometimes detrimental self-involvement of narcissists. Lesson by W. Keith Campbell, animation by TOGETHER.


Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory. The discovery, made by Kuo and his colleagues at the BICEP2 experiment, represents the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the first tremors of the Big Bang. Producer: Bjorn Carey Video: Kurt Hickman For more on the discovery, see:


Every second of your life you are under attack. Bacteria, viruses, spores and more living stuff wants to enter your body and use its resources for itself. The immune system is a powerful army of cells that fights like a T-Rex on speed and sacrifices itself for your survival. Without it you would die in no time. This sounds simple but the reality is complex, beautiful and just awesome. An animation of the immune system. We are thinking of making an App for tablets out of this video. Would you like that? Did you think the visual system we developed worked? Feedback is much appreciated! You can get the MUSIC of the video here: Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars jordan gardner Derek Loa Jeroen Koerts Carlos Campuzano Benoît Graham Scott Zell Tanya Smirnova Giovanna Cardoso Patrick Eyrich Alex Kaplan Chris Dudley Deanie Adams Caroline Andrewes Dean Herbert Rory Bennett Adam Primaeros Rasmus Lind Daniel O.C.L. Dylan Hoffer Maxl Heitsch Eliud Vasquez Neve Laughery Ghitea Andrei Paul Alexander Law McCormack Heavens Eduardo Barbosa Sara Shah Dario Pagnia Chris Doughty Evan Low Stephen Morse Bünyamin Tetik Romano Casellini dante harper Justin T. Greeny Liu Siddharth Bajaj Valerie Brunet Jen Tim Peter Wagner Yousif Efe Melih Polat Gaëtan Maximilian Ritter Charles Kuang Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Petr Pilař Finn Edwards Thomas Lee Daniel Fuchs Pascal B. Seona Tea Pol Lutgen Roman Zolotorevich Daniel Jonathan Velazquez Gore Jeff Church Churchill Randy Knapp Brandon Liu Peter Žnuderl Swarochisha Kandregula Javier de la Garza Jan Lukas Lehmann somersault18:24 Why you are still alive - The immune system explained Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: The Earth intercepts a lot of solar power: 173,000 terawatts. That’s 10,000 times more power than the planet’s population uses. So is it possible that one day the world could be completely reliant on solar energy? Richard Komp examines how solar panels convert solar energy to electrical energy. Lesson by Richard Komp, animation by Globizco.


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Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, They don't pay me to like the kids. Her response: Kids don't learn from people they don't like.' A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


View full lesson: When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine -- an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. Lesson by Nicole Avena, animation by STK Films.


Whether or not it's worth investing in, the math behind Bitcoin is an elegant solution to some complex problems. Hosted by: Michael Aranda Special Thanks: Dalton Hubble Learn more about Cryptography: ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Bella Nash, Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Will and Sonja Marple, Philippe von Bergen, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: ---------- Sources: 36bd8b2d25ee Image Sources:


Use the URL: for 10% with a new website and support this channel. Also make your life easier. Thanks a lot to Squarespace for supporting the show! There are cosmic snipers firing at random into the unvierse. What are they and what happens if they hit us? Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: bandcamp: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: John Wendeborn, Mia Butorac, Wesley Byrd, Richard Judd, Max Bowers, Mitchell Greenaway, Albinomaur, Harry, Erik, Onnen, Connor, Woodard, BurmansHealthShop, Output Coupler, William Hector, Wes, Quantum Cat, Kyle Fox, Leo Caillard, Alex Tudorica, Nicholas Peterson, Haden Wasserbaech, Robert Martin, Brian David Henderson, Justin Rimando, JMW, MartinHanzlík, Veritasium, Oli Boersma, Fredrik Sundqvist, Brayden Hull, Dwight VanTuyl, Karl Ostmo, Annemarie Landman, Alfonso Cornejo, James Cochran, Paul Craig, Syed Rafay Mahmood, Justin Ritchie, Victor Hilario, David Humphreys, Brian, Nicholas Bethencourt, Nate Guest, Razvan Caliman, Steven Arcangeli, Ryan Poole, Samantha Adikari, Skid Vis, Muhammad Ragab, Kasper Eriksen, Connor Findlay, Matt Tavani, Thomas Leese, Daniel Podobinski, Corey Hinds, Milosz, Jeroen Klapwijk, Nicole Kalagayan, Dan Longauer, Dennis, Lorenzo89er, Charles Shuller, Dana Levinthal, Adam Thompson-Sharpe, shahad sadeq, Jenny Ng, Leo Herzog, Charles Macdonald, Jill Hoffman, Bluesparks, ethnicolor, Jacob Venable, Andrei-Gabriel, Michal Ciechomski, Wisecrack, Brett Smithson Death From Space — Gamma-Ray Bursts Explained Help us caption & translate this video!


A head-vaporizing laser with a perfect wavelength detecting sub-proton space-time ripples. Huge thanks to Prof Rana Adhikari and LIGO: Here's how he felt when he learned about the first ever detection: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal Support Veritasium on Patreon: A lot of videos have covered the general overview of the discovery of gravitational waves, what they are, the history of the search, when they were found but I wanted to delve into the absurd science that made the detection possible. When scientists want one megawatt of laser power, it's not just for fun (though I'm sure it's that too), it's because the fluctuations in the number of photons is proportional to their square root, making more powerful beams less noisy (as a fraction of their total). The smoothest mirrors were created not for aesthetic joy but because when you're trying to measure wiggles that are a fraction the width of a proton, a rough mirror surface simply won't do. Filmed by Daniel Joseph Files Music by Kevin MacLeod, Black Vortex (appropriately named) Music licensed from Epidemic Sound Observations 2 (also appropriately named)


Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: Chris Lonsdale is Managing Director of Chris Lonsdale & Associates, a company established to catalyse breakthrough performance for individuals and senior teams. In addition, he has also developed a unique and integrated approach to learning that gives people the means to acquire language or complex technical knowledge in short periods of time. Jan-21-2014 Update. The video transcripts are now available via the following links: English Only: English + Chinese Translation: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)


This Greek philosopher, one of our favourites, spent his life arriving at fascinating answers to the largest puzzle there is: What makes people happy? If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): FURTHER READING “The Ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus was born in 341 BC, on the island of Samos, a few miles off the coast of modern Turkey. He had an unusually long beard, wrote over three hundred books and was one of the most famous philosophers of his age. What made him famous was his skilful and relentless focus on one particular subject:happiness. Previously, philosophers had wanted to know how to be good; Epicurus insisted he wanted to focus on how to be happy.” You can read more on this and many other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org: MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: More films on PHILOSOPHY in our playlist below: Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mad Adam


In which John Green teaches you about the roots of the American Revolution. The Revolution did not start on July 4, 1776. The Revolutionary War didn't start on July 4 either. (as you remember, I'm sure, the Revolution and the Revolutionary War are not the same thing) The shooting started on April 19, 1775, at Lexington and/or Concord, MA. Or the shooting started with the Boston Massacre on March 5, 1770. At least we can pin down the Declaration of Independence to July 4, 1776. Except that most of the signers didn't sign until August 2. The point is that the beginning of the Revolution is very complex and hard to pin down. John will lead you through the bramble of taxes, royal decrees, acts of parliament, colonial responses, and various congresses. We'll start with the end of the Seven Years War, and the bill that the British ran up fighting the war. This led to taxes on colonial trade, which led to colonists demanding representation, which led to revolution. It all seems very complicated, but Crash Course will get you through it in about 12 minutes. Turn on the captions. You'll like them! Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Many events paved the road to American Independence from England: England’s taxation on American colonists led to the famous 1773 Boston Tea Party: And in 1775, Patrick Henry delivered a speech that rallied Virginias to form a militia against Britain: Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! Look at this! thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon:


The philosophy of Kurzgesagt. Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch: Music by Epic Mountain Music: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: Help us caption & translate this video! Optimistic Nihilism


View full lesson: Nostalgia was once considered an illness confined to specific groups of people. Today, people all over the world report experiencing and enjoying nostalgia. But how does nostalgia work? And is it healthy? Clay Routledge details the way our understanding of nostalgia has changed since the term was first coined in the late 17th century. Lesson by Clay Routledge, animation by Anton Bogaty.


Discuss this video: Robots, Etc: Terex Port automation: Command | Cat MieStar System.: Bosch Automotive Technology: Atlas Update: Kiva Systems: PhantomX running Phoenix code: iRobot, Do You: New pharmacy robot at QEHB: Briggo Coffee Experience: John Deere Autosteer ITEC Pro 2010. In use while cultivating: The Duel: Timo Boll vs. KUKA Robot: Baxter with the Power of Intera 3: Baxter Research Robot SDK 1.0: Baxter the Bartender: Online Cash Registers Touch-Screen EPOS System Demonstration: Self-Service Check in: Robot to play Flappy Bird: e-david from University of Konstanz, Germany: Sedasys: Empty Car Convoy: Clever robots for crops: Autonomously folding a pile of 5 previously-unseen towels: t=94 LS3 Follow Tight: Robotic Handling material: Caterpillar automation project: Universal Robots has reinvented industrial robotics: Introducing WildCat: The Human Brain Project - Video Overview: This Robot Is Changing How We Cure Diseases: Jeopardy! - Watson Game 2: What Will You Do With Watson?: Other Credits Mandelbrot set: Moore's law graph: Apple II 1977: Beer Robot Fail m2803: All Wales Ambulance Promotional Video: Clyde Robinson: Time lapse Painting - Monster Spa:


It is time to reframe how we think about our past. We need a new year 0 for humanity. But which one should we choose and why? Or support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: Thanks a lot to Matthew Lloyd for fact checking help with the video! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Stuart Alldritt, Tasia Pele, Stan Serebryakov, Mike Janzen, Jason Heddle, August, Daniel Smith, Jonathan Herman, Rahul Rachuri, Piotr Gorzelany, Lisa Allcott, Горан Гулески, Eric Ziegast, Kean Drake, Friendly Stranger, NicoH, Adrian Rutkiewicz, Markus Klemm, Leandro Nascimento, Gary Chan, Shawhin Layeghi, Oscar Hernandez, Dale Prinsse, Vaclav Vyskocil, Sup3rW00t, Ryan Coonan, Tam Lerner, Dewi Cadat, Luis Aguirre, Andy McVey, Vexorum, Boris, Adam Wisniewski, Yannic Schreiber, Erik Lilly, Ellis, Dmitry Starostin, Akshay Joshi, Peter Tinti, kayle Clark, Mortimer Brewster, Marc Legault, Sumita Pal, Tarje Hellebust Jr., streetdragon95, Taratsamura, Sam Dickson, Bogdan Firicel, Saul Vera, Aaron Jacobs, Ben Arts, R B Dean, Kevin Beedon, Patrik Pärkinen, Duncan Graham, Johan Thomsen, Emily Tran, Adam Flanc, Adam Jermyn, Ali Uluyol Help us caption & translate this video! A New History for Humanity – The Human Era


How to make yourself sad. Sponsor: VERY IMPORTANT FOOTNOTE: Discuss this video: Special Thanks: Randy J. Paterson PhD Patreons: Mark Govea, Thomas J Miller Jr MD, Bob Kunz, John Buchan, Andres Villacres, Nevin Spoljaric, Christian Cooper, Michael Little, Ripta Pasay, Tony DiLascio, Richard Jenkins, Chris Chapin, Saki Comandao, Tod Kurt, Jason Lewandowski, Michael Mrozek, Phil Gardner, سليمان العقل, Jordan Melville, Martin , Steven Grimm, rictic , Ian , Faust Fairbrook, Chris Woodall, Kozo Ota, Colin Millions, Guillermo , Timothy Basanov, Chris Harshman, ChoiceMechanicalDenver.com , Donal Botkin, David Michaels, Ron Bowes, Tómas Árni Jónasson, Mikko , Derek Bonner, Derek Jackson, Orbit_Junkie , Alistair Forbes, Robert Grünke (trainfart), Veronica Peshterianu, Paul Tomblin, Travis Wichert, chrysilis , Ryan E Manning, Erik Parasiuk, Rhys Parry, Maarten van der Blij, Kevin Anderson, Ryan Nielsen, Esteban Santana Santana, Dag Viggo Lokøen, Tristan Watts-Willis, John Rogers, Edward Adams, Leon , ken mcfarlane, Brandon Callender, Timothy Moran, Peter Lomax, Emil , Tijmen van Dien, ShiroiYami , Alex Schuldberg, Bear , Jacob Ostling, Solon Carter, Rescla , Andrew Proue, Tor Henrik Lehne, David Palomares, Cas Eliëns, Freddi Hørlyck, Ernesto Jimenez, Osric Lord-Williams, Maxime Zielony, Lachlan Holmes , John Bevan, John Lee, Ian N Riopel, AUFFRAY Clement, David , Alex Morales, Alexander Kosenkov, Elizabeth Keathley, Kevin , Pierre Perrott, Tadeo Kondrak, James Bissonette, Jahmal O'Neil, Naturally Curious, Nantiwat , Tianyu Ge, Kevin Jeun, Jason Ruel, JoJo Chehebar, Danny Lunianga Xavier, Jeremy Peng, Jennifer Richardson, Rustam Anvarov Music by:


In which John Green teaches you about the (English) colonies in what is now the United States. He covers the first permanent English colony at Jamestown, Virginia, the various theocracies in Massachusetts, the feudal kingdom in Maryland, and even a bit about the spooky lost colony at Roanoke Island. What were the English doing in America, anyway? Lots of stuff. In Virginia, the colonists were largely there to make money. In Maryland, the idea was to create a a colony for Catholics who wanted to be serfs of the Lords Baltimore. In Massachusetts, the Pilgrims and Puritans came to America to find a place where they could freely persecute those who didn't share their beliefs. But there was a healthy profit motive in Massachusetts as well. Profits were thin at first, and so were the colonists. Trouble growing food and trouble with the natives kept the early colonies from success. Before long though, the colonists started cultivating tobacco, which was a win for everyone involved if you ignore the lung cancer angle. So kick back, light up a smoke, and learn how America became profitable. DON'T SMOKE, THOUGH! THAT WAS A JOKE! Tun on the captions, you'll like them! Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Modern Native Americans have varied perspectives on Thanksgiving and the start of European colonization in America. Chuck Larsen's Plymouth Thanksgiving Story reveals a new native and anthropological take on the famous first Thanksgiving meal: follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Like us! Look at this! Support CrashCourse on Patreon:


Automation in the Information Age is different. Books we used for this video: The Rise of the Robots: The Second Machine Age: Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Robot Poster & Kurzgesagt merch here: The music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: – Study about job automation in the next two decades: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Brandon Eversole, Andrew Anglehart, Christian Ahlin, Kathleen Woolum, Estel Anahmias, Adam Schlender, Mike Luque, Encyclo, Stevie Taylor, Brent Yoder, Invisibleman, Jeff Lam, Christopher Hayes, Oliver Walker, gwendolyn bellermann, Matt Logan, Philip Chou, Brandon Young, Arlo Stewart, Thomas Hodnemyr, Viachaslau Hurmanau, Sam Cousins, Robin Hultgren, Jose Schroeder, Ched, Claustrophobya, Charles Wang, Dolan Dark, Casaro, Donglin Li, Sarah Thompson, Pamela Palmer, Fergal Harrington, Jonas Erath, Spencer, Zsuzsi Balai, Tyler Roberts, Allyssa Blalock, Robert Bishop, Carl-Johan Linde, Thomas Nielsen, Heather Pray, Marco Boneberger, Mehsotopes, Joe Johnston, ugo dubois, Keagan Boys, Miles Gard, Frantisek Sumsala, Scott, Tobias Theobald, Solar3ty Games, Nicholas Carr, K41N_of_2358, Daniel RodrÌguez, Pixlpit, Gytis Kirvela, Thomas Flanigan, Dwagon, Costin Graur, Mavis Everett, Kwiatkowski Robert, Huo Benpeng, Dan Gretton, Joshua Davison, Bryce Comp, Andrey Lipattsev, DEFECT DAVIS, Gurleen Saini, Andrew FastLizard4 Adams, Isak Hietala, Leon Han, Sarah Johnson, Kieran Chakravorty, Hanna Khoury, Kimberly Martin, Jon Glass, Julius Wroblewski, Ben Zautner, Kester Falge, Juan Florez, Tad Moore Help us caption & translate this video! The Rise of the Machines – Why Automation is Different This time


Don't forget! Crash Course posters and t-shirts at In which John Green teaches you about China's Revolutions. While the rest of the world was off having a couple of World Wars, China was busily uprooting the dynastic system that had ruled there for millennia. Most revolutions have some degree of tumult associated with them, but China's 20th century revolutions were REALLY disruptive. In 1911 and 1912, Chinese nationalists brought 3000 years of dynastic rule to an end. China plunged into chaos as warlords staked out regions of the country for themselves. The nationalists and communists joined forces briefly to bring the nation back together under the Chinese Republic, and then they quickly split and started fighting the Chinese Civil War. The fight between nationalists and communists went on for decades, and was interrupted by an alliance to fight the invading Japanese during World War II. After the World War II ended, the Chinese Civil War was back on. Mao and the communists were ultimately victorious, and Chiang Kai-Shek ended up in Taiwan. And then it got weird. Mao spent years repeatedly trying to purify the Communist Party and build up the new People's Republic of China with Rectifications, Anti Campaigns, Five Year Plans. the Great Leap Forward, and the Cultural Revolution. These had mixed results, to say the least. John will cover all this and more in this week's Crash Course World History. Crash Course is now available on DVD! Resources: The Search for Modern China by Jonathan D. Spence - Blood Red Sunset: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution by Ma Bo - Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Like us! Look at this! Support Crash Course on Patreon:


Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Check out more TED Talks: Follow TED on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


Now that we've talked about your blood vessels, we're going to zoom in a little closer and talk about your blood itself. We'll start by outlining the basic components of blood -- including erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma -- as well as the basic process of hemostasis that stops bleeding, and how antigens are responsible for the blood type that you have. By the end of this episode, you should be totally prepared for your next blood drive. Table of Contents The Basic Components of Blood 2:30 Erythrocytes, Leukocytes, Platelets, and Plasma 3:00 The Basic Process of Hemostasis 4:45 How Antigens Are Responsible For Your Blood Type 6:21 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Support Crash Course on Patreon: CC Kids:


The total solar eclipse from Madras, Oregon on August 21, 2017. As the moon passed in front of the sun turning day to night and revealing the sun's corona, apparently all I could think to say was 'Oh my goodness!' Special thanks to Patreon Supporters: Nathan Hansen, Donal Botkin, Ron Neal, Zach Mueller, Jeff Straathof, Curational, Tony Fadell Everyone says not to photograph your first solar eclipse and I think they might be right. I was focused on getting the exposure right for Bailey's beads and the diamond ring, plus making sure to get the corona and solar flares. This was a bit stressful but I'm delighted with the results. This video originally included more info but since I'm uploading from Madras where the internet is sluggish, I cut out three minutes so the upload would happen before I had to leave for my flight. Special thanks also to Dr. Teagan Wall for sharing this experience with me and Raquel Nuno for inspiring me to come to Oregon. Music from Spinning Earth 2 and Kevin MacLeod Big Mojo


View full lesson here: The ubiquitous yin-yang symbol holds its roots in Taoism/Daoism, a Chinese religion and philosophy. The yin, the dark swirl, is associated with shadows, femininity, and the trough of a wave; the yang, the light swirl, represents brightness, passion and growth. John Bellaimey explains why we all contain the spirit of yin and of yang -- and how we can achieve a balance of both in our lives. Lesson by John Bellaimey, animation by TED-Ed.


View full lesson: Beneath your ribs, you’ll find, among other things, the pancreas -- an organ that works a lot like a personal health coach. Emma Bryce explains how this organ controls your sugar levels and produces a special juice that releases the nutrients from your food to help keep you in the best possible shape. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Tremendousness.


SciShow takes you down the deepest hole in the world -- Russia's Kola Superdeep Borehole -- explaining who dug it and why, and what we learned about Earth in the process. Don't fall! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: Written by Dave Loos ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Thanks Tank Tumblr: Sources:


SciShow explores the grim story of the lobotomy, the medical procedure that earned its inventor perhaps the most regrettable Nobel Prize in history. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: Sources:


A rare look inside the Svalbard Global Seed Vault which is closed ~350 days a year Check out Audible: More info on the seed vault: My trip to Norway was funded by Screen Australia, Film Victoria and Genepool Productions as part of a new project. More information soon. Special thanks to Bente Naeverdal and the Crop Trust:


Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly. Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: bandcamp: Thanks to Volker Henn, James Gurney and (prefers anonymity) for help with this video! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Jeffrey Schneider, Konstantin Kaganovich, Tom Leiser, Archie Castillo, Russell Eishard, Ben Kershaw, Marius Stollen, Henry Bowman, Ben Johns, Bogdan Radu, Sam Toland, Pierre Thalamy, Christopher Morgan, Rocks Arent People, Ross Devereux, Pascal Michaud, Derek DuBreuil, Sofia Quintero, Robert Swiniarski, Merkt Kızılırmak, Michelle Rowley, Andy Dong, Saphir Patel, Harris Rotto, Thomas Huzij, Ryan James Burke, NTRX, Chaz Lewis, Amir Resali, The War on Stupid, John Pestana, Lucien Delbert, iaDRM, Jacob Edwards, Lauritz Klaus, Jason Hunt, Marcus : ), Taylor Lau, Rhett H Eisenberg, Mr.Z, Jeremy Dumet, Fatman13, Kasturi Raghavan, Kousora, Rich Sekmistrz, Mozart Peter, Gaby Germanos, Andreas Hertle, Alena Vlachova, Zdravko Šašek SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: The best book we read about the topic: GMO Sapiens (affiliate link, we get a cut if buy the book!) – Good Overview by Wired: –timeline of computer development: – Selective breeding: – DNA: – Radiation research: – inserting DNA snippets into organisms: – First genetically modified animal: – First GM patent: – chemicals produced by GMOs: – Flavr Savr Tomato: – First Human Engineering: – glowing fish: – CRISPR: – HIV cut from cells and rats with CRISPR: – first human CRISPR trials fighting cancer: first human CRISPR trial approved by Chinese for August 2016: – genetic diseases: – pregnancies with Down Syndrome terminated: ( 1999 European study) – CRISPR and aging: Help us caption & translate this video!


In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: Support is provided by Voqal: Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Instagram -


Planet Earth is this solid thing you are standing on right now. In your everyday life you don't really waste a thought about how amazing this is. A giant, ancient, hot rock. How did it come into existence and how big is it really? You will be surprised. The ground you are standing on is just a very, very small part of the big picture. THANK YOU FOR AN AWESOME YEAR YOUTUBE! :D LINK Thomas who makes our MUSIC has his own company now!! So if you want music as awesome as ours or just take a look at the music from the last videos, here is Thomas' new website and his soundcloud at & epic-mountain.com & soundcloud.com/epicmountain. Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars Opal Hartbower jordan gardner Jeff Le Devir Islas Scott Zell Jeroen Koerts Derek Loa Chris Kitching Tony Morley Tanya Smirnova Patrick Eyrich J.J. Chris Linardos Dean Herbert Adam Primaeros Rory Bennett Gaëtan Duvaux Rasmus Lind Caroline Andrewes Deanie Adams Chris Dudley Alex Kaplan KokLiang Lim Alexander Law McCormack Heavens Chris Doughty Dario Pagnia Sara Shah Eduardo Barbosa Ghitea Andrei Paul Neve Laughery Eliud Vasquez Maximilian Heitsch Sebastian Laiseca Alejandro Liechty David Davenport-Firth Janne Jaukkuri Pascal B. Brandon Liu Tim Justin T. Daniel O.C.L. Leigh Thompson Heemi Kutia Valerie Brunet somersault18:24 Javier de la Garza Peter Žnuderl Randy Knapp Benoît Graham Jeff Churchill Jonathan Velazquez Gore Daniel Pol Lutgen Seona Tea Daniel Fuchs Thomas Lee Finn Edwards Petr Pilař Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Fabricio Godoy Charles Kuang Maximilian Ritter Yousif Jesse Powell Peter Wagner Igor Benicio de Mesquita Siddharth Bajaj Greeny Liu Tibor Schiemann dante harper Bünyamin Tetik Stephen Morse Evan Low Dario *Liquid TLO* Wünsch Matthew Macomber Evan Ziggy Freed Chase Gotlieb Brian David Henderson Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth Help us caption & translate this video!


Hank explains the science behind the effects of that wackiest of weeds, cannabis sativa - aka marijuana. Like SciShow on Facebook: Follow SciShow on Twitter: Citations The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan Images


You can directly support Crash Course at Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. What does Psychology mean? Where does it come from? Hank gives you a 10 minute intro to one of the more tricky sciences and talks about some of the big names in the development of the field. Welcome to Crash Course Psychology!!! -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Support CrashCourse on Subbable:


Student guides Karen and Christian lead you on a whirlwind tour of the Stanford campus. The tour begins at Stanford Stadium, home to Cardinal football, and ends at the Stanford Visitor Center. Along they way you'll see the Quad, the Dish, and even do a little fountain hopping. This video was originally produced for the launch of the PAC12 Network, Stanford University: Stanford University Channel on YouTube:


The crazy story of the arbitrary temperature scale used in a tiny minority of countries. Check out Audible: Snatoms are available again! Support Veritasium on Patreon: Celsius didn't invent Celsius: Video animated by Marcello Ascani: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi Music by Kevin MacLeod: Modern Piano Zeta - Improbable Ice Demon Divertimento K131 Sneaky Adventure Sheep May Safely Graze Professor and the Plant References: A History of the Thermometer and its uses in Meteorology by W. E. Knowles Middleton Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman The Science of Measurement, A Historical Survey by Herbert Arthur Klein Lehrbuch der Chemie by Jöns Jakob Berzelius Script: As an Australian-Canadian the Fahrenheit temperature scale always seemsed a bit arbitrary. I mean why does water freeze at 32 degrees? And what exactly does zero represent? According to many sources the Fahrenheit scale was defined by setting zero degrees equal to the temperature of an ice, salt, and water mixture and 100 degrees being roughly equal to human body temperature. But that isn’t true. The real story is much more interesting, and scientific. August 14th 1701 was almost certainly the worst day in the life of fifteen year-old Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit. On that day both of his parents died suddenly from mushroom poisoning. He was sent from Poland, where he lived, to Amsterdam to become an apprentice bookkeeper. But Fahrenheit couldn’t stand his apprenticeship and ran away so many times his employers put out a warrant for his arrest. Traveling from city to city around Europe, he became fascinated with scientific instruments and in particular thermometers. In 1708, possibly seeking help with the warrant, Fahrenheit met with the mayor of Copenhagen, who happened to be the famous astronomer Ole Romer. Romer is known for observing the eclipses of Jupiter’s moons and realizing that variations in the timing of those eclipses was caused by the time it took light to reach Earth. In other words, he found a way to accurately measure the finite speed of light. But more pertinent to this story, in 1702 Romer was housebound after breaking his leg. To pass the time he devised a new temperature scale with the freezing point of water at 7.5 degrees and body temperature at 22.5 degrees. This might seem odd until you consider that Romer wanted the boiling point of water to be 60 degrees (as an astronomer, he had experience dividing things by 60). If you take this scale, divide it in half, in half again, and in half once more, you find the freezing point of water 1/8th up the scale, and human body temperature 3/8th up the scale. So at their meeting in 1708, Fahrenheit learned of Romer’s temperature scale and adopted it as his own, adjusting it slightly because he found it “inconvenient and inelegant on account of the fractional numbers”. So he scaled them up to 8 and 24. That is the original Fahrenheit scale. He produced thermometers for some time using this scale. But then, at some later time Fahrenheit multiplied all numbers on his scale by four, setting freezing point to the now familiar 32 and body temperature to 96. It’s unclear exactly why he did this. He may just have wanted finer precision in his measurements but I think there was a better reason. You see, Fahrenheit was an excellent instrument maker. His thermometers agreed with each other precisely, at a time when that was unheard of. He pioneered the use of mercury as a measuring liquid, which has the benefit of a much higher boiling point than the alcohol used in most other thermometers at the time. For these accomplishments, he was inducted into the British Royal Society. And we know he read the works of Newton, Boyle, and Hooke, in which he would have come across the idea that a one degree increase in temperature should correspond to a specific fractional increase in the volume of the measuring liquid. And today a one degree Fahrenheit increase in temperature increases the volume of mercury by exactly one part in 10,000. Is this just a coincidence? We’ll probably never know for sure because as an instrument maker Fahrenheit was secretive about his methods. But I think the data strongly suggests this was the case. So what exactly did zero represent on the scales of Fahrenheit and Romer? By many accounts it’s the temperature of a salt, ice and water mixture. But there are different descriptions of these mixtures and none of them actually produces the temperature they’re supposed to. More likely I think they picked the coldest temperature in winter, set that as zero and later used ice and brine to calibrate new thermometers. Now his scale is only used regularly in the Cayman Islands, Bahamas, Belize, oh and the United States of America.


Explanation of gyro precession: More: Less Than: Equal To: Huge thanks to A/Prof Emeritus Rod Cross, Helen Georgiou for filming, Alex Yeung, and Chris Stewart, the University of Sydney Mechanical Engineering shop, Duncan and co. Ralph and the School of Physics. In this video I attempt to lift a 19kg (42 lbs) wheel over my head one-handed while it's spinning at a few thousand RPM. This replicates an earlier experiment by Professor Eric Laithwaite. He claimed the wheel was 'light as a feather' and could not be explained by Newton's Laws. I wanted to find out for myself what I really felt like. Music By Kevin MacLeod Tempting Secrets


On August 21st, 2017, millions of people in the United States will watch as the sun, moon, and earth align for a rare and extraordinary event—a total solar eclipse. ➡ Subscribe: ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at Get More National Geographic: Official Site: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: Only lasting a few short minutes, the moon will plunge the Earth into the darkness of its shadow as it passes in front of the sun. This short film by Wylie Overstreet and Alex Gorosh explains what happens during a total solar eclipse and why you won't want to miss it. Wylie Overstreet: Alex Gorosh: This Guy Explains Why the Solar Eclipse Will Blow Your Mind | Short Film Showcase National Geographic


Oh my, Craig has his work cut out for him this week. The process of how a bill becomes a law can be pretty complex, fraught with potential bill-death at every corner. As if just getting through committee isn’t difficult enough, bills have to navigate a series of amendments and votes in both houses, potentially more committees, further compromise bills, and even more floor votes, just to end up on the chopping block of the president. And then in one fell swoop the president can stop a bill in its tracks with a veto! But then again, a presidential veto isn’t necessarily a bill’s end either. As you can see we’ve got to lot to cover, and we’ll be the first to admit this has been covered before, and extraordinarily well might we add, by the folks at School House Rock. But we’ll give it our best shot - without the singing of course. Well, not too much singing anyway. Support is provided by Voqal: This episode is sponsored by Squarespace: Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Support Crash Course on Patreon: CC Kids:


Hank brings us the tale of the bizarre and eccentric genius with the crazy eyes who spent his life increasing awesome wherever he went, and contributed in some way to pretty much every cool invention you can think of. Nikola Tesla spoke eight languages and, at the time of his death, held over 700 patents and was being investigated by the US government for claiming to have invented a 60 million volt death ray. Tesla was an undisputed genius, and SciShow gold. Like SciShow! Follow SciShow References: This video uses the following sounds from Freesound.org: Tesla ascending-m.wav by Rmutt


Saturn is the crown jewel of the solar system, beautiful and fascinating. It is a gas giant, and has a broad set of rings made of ice particles. Moons create gaps in the rings via their gravity. Saturn has dozens of moons, including Titan, which is as big as Mercury and has a thick atmosphere and lakes of methane; and Enceladus which has an undersurface ocean and eruptions of water geysers. While we are still uncertain, it is entirely possible that either or both moons may support life. This episode was brought to you by Squarespace -- Table of Contents Saturn is a Gas Giant 0:33 Moons Create Gaps in the Ice Rings 5:17 Dozens of Moons 6:18 Titan’s Methane Lakes 7:56 Enceladus’s Water Geysers 8:33 Life Potential 9:30 -- PBS Digital Studios: Follow Phil on Twitter: Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Support CrashCourse on Patreon: -- PHOTOS/VIDEOS Saturn [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/G. Ugarkovic] Interiors [credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute] Saturn Ring Plane Crossing [credit: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona Lunar & Planetary Lab) and NASA/ESA] Translucent Rings [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute] Catching its Tail [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute] Enter the Vortex [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] The Rose [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Ice [credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado] Saturn’s rings to scale [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Saturn’s Ring Plane /media/File:Saturn%27s_ring_plane.jpg [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute - Cassini-Huygens/NASA] Saturn [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/G. Ugarkovic] Shaping the Drapes (video) [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Peaks /media/File:PIA11668_B_ring_peaks_2x_crop.jpg [credit: NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab / Space Science Institute] Mimas Cassini /media/File:Mimas_Cassini.jpg [credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute] Cassini NAC RGB [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/G. Ugarkovic] Titan /media/File:Titan2005.jpg [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Titan’s Nile River [credit: NASA/JPL–Caltech/ASI] Lakes [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/USGS] Enceladus [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Iapetus Ridge /media/File:Iapetus_706_1419_1.jpg [credit: NASA (Cassini probe), Matt McIrvin (image mosaic)] Hyperion [credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute] Saturn eclipse mosaic /media/File:PIA17172_Saturn_eclipse_mosaic_bright_crop.jpg [credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute]


Can you find the mistakes? I am student , I am agree , Yesterday, I'm go downtown , He no have money , I want to meet the downtown. If you don't know, this is the lesson for you! These are mistakes made by students of all levels, so watch this video and learn to avoid these common errors. Take the quiz here: And don't forget to check out our other video on 5 common English learner mistakes: TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on five more common English learner mistakes. So if you have watched my other video on five common English learner mistakes, this is a follow up to give you five more. So let's not waste time and get right to it. Here we go with No. 1. So this first mistake is common because in many languages, when you discuss jobs or your station in life, you don't use articles even if you come from a country where there are articles in the language. So for example, I am student. He is engineer. If I ask you, What do you do , you need to use an article because student is countable; it's singular; and engineer' is countable and it's singular. So you have to say, I am a student. He is an engineer. Now, let's move on to No. 2. Okay. Here, we have two sentences on the board. We have, I am agree. Are you agree? So in this situation, agree is a verb. We don't say, I am agree. You can just say, I agree. If it's negative, I don't agree or, I disagree. And the question is not, Are you agree? It's, Do you agree? Now, if you are set on wanting to say I am and use agree in some way, you would have to say, I am in agreement. This is very formal, but it is possible. Otherwise, you say, I agree or, I disagree and, Do you agree? Now, let's move on to No. 3. This next mistake is about the use of the past tense. For new English speakers, because they can't form the past tense, sometimes they use the verb to be with the verb. So I have heard, I'm go downtown yesterday. Or, He was see his cousin. If you are speaking in the past, make sure you simply use the past simple verb. In this situation, we don't say I'm go. The past of go is went. I went downtown. We don't say he was see. The past of see is saw. So this is about using the past simple form of the verb to speak about the past. Never say I'm go , I'm do , I'm make. I saw ; I made ; I did ; I played. Okay? Now, let's move on to No. 4. Now, this mistake is about using negatives. In many languages, whether they're European or Latin, Spanish, I hear this frequently. So you might hear, He no have money or, They no like chocolate. So if you are making a sentence in the sent simple, and you want to make it negative, you have to use doesn't and don't. So not he no have but, He doesn't have. Okay? Not they no like chocolate but, They don't like chocolate. So make sure you learn how to make negative sentences. He doesn't ; I don't ; we don't ; they don't ; not he no , she no , I no. All right? Now, let's move on to No. 5. Finally, here we have a word choice error. And this is because maybe speakers translate from their own language, and many languages, you can use the verbs meet or know to talk about going to places and getting to know cities and towns, for example. So, I want to meet the city or, Yesterday, I knew downtown. Now, in English, we don't really use the verbs know and meet to talk about getting to know a place. You can use the verbs explore or get to know or visit. So you can say, you know, I want to explore the city. I want to go around the city. Yesterday, I knew downtown -- Yesterday, I traveled around downtown. And you can also use terms like get to know a place. You can visit a place. You can explore a place. Okay? But you can't meet a park. You can meet a person, but you can't meet a place. Now, let's review all five of these mistakes one more time. All right. So to review, No. 1, I am a student. If you want to talk about your status in life. Are you a student? An engineer? Are you a teacher? Etc. you need to use an article to talk about jobs, professions, talk about your station in life. No. 2, I agree, not I am agree. Do you agree? Not are you agree? No. 3, I went downtown. I saw my cousin. So remember, memorize those past tense verbs. Not I was go or I am go. I went ; I saw ; I did. All right?


Note from TED: This talk, which features health advice based on a personal narrative, has been flagged as potentially outside TED's curatorial guidelines. Viewer discretion advised. The guidelines we give our TEDx organizers are described in more detail here: ***** Dr. Terry Wahls learned how to properly fuel her body. Using the lessons she learned at the subcellular level, she used diet to cure her MS and get out of her wheelchair.


Would you choose to build a house on top of an unfinished foundation? Of course not. Why, then, do we rush students through education when they haven't always grasped the basics? Yes, it's complicated, but educator Sal Khan shares his plan to turn struggling students into scholars by helping them master concepts at their own pace. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


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