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How far would a basketball with backspin go? Rotor wing experimental aircraft: E-ship 1: Corner kick by Kyle: How Ridiculous World Record Basket:


Neutron Stars are some of the strangest things in the Universe. Not quite massive enough to become black holes they are basically atoms as big as mountains with properties so extreme it's mind-blowing. And if you get too close to a neutron star you are in big trouble… Lots of you told us youtube doesn't tell you when we release new content. So we made a newsletter. No spam ever: (Never miss a new video again) The music of the video can be found here: & Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars Opal Hartbower jordan gardner Derek Loa Chris Kitching Jeff Le Devir Islas Andrew Connor Francesca Monteiro Scott Zell Jeroen Koerts Tanya Smirnova Patrick Eyrich J.J. Chris Linardos Tony Morley Ben Nunan Moe Levin Pholpat Durongbhan Raphael Caroline Andrewes Alex Kaplan KokLiang Lim Thomas Borg trefmanic Mathias Westad Larssen Katia Lira Adam Smith Dean Herbert Giovanna Cardoso Adam Primaeros Rory Bennett Gaëtan Duvaux Rasmus Lind Ghitea Andrei Paul Larry Bunyard Maximilian Heitsch Sebastian Laiseca Ata Celbis Andrzej Rejman Benjamin Fries Alexander Heavens Chris Doughty Dario Pagnia Sara Shah Eduardo Barbosa Maximilian Ritter Yousif Jesse Powell Peter Wagner Eliud Vasquez Igor Benicio de Mesquita Siddharth Bajaj Greeny Liu Tibor Schiemann dante harper Bünyamin Tetik Joe Pond Stephen Morse Jørgen Smalås Evan Low Dario „TLO“ Wünsch Matthew Macomber Ziggy Freed Chase Gotlieb Brian David Henderson Alejandro Liechty David Davenport-Firth Janne Jaukkuri Michael Ren Peter Schuller tBinger Brandy Alexander Alexander Kosenkov Scott Laing Gizem Gürkan George Chearswat oscar gautama Pascal B. Brandon Liu Tim Justin T. Daniel O.C.L. Leigh Thompson Heemi Kutia Valerie Brunet somersault18:24 Jan Lukas Lehmann Javier de la Garza Peter Žnuderl Randy Knapp Benoît Graham Jeff Churchill Jonathan Velazquez Gore Daniel Roman Zolotorevich Pol Lutgen Seona Tea Daniel Fuchs Thomas Lee Finn Edwards Petr Pilař Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Fabricio Godoy Charles Kuang Atoms As Big As Mountains – Neutron Stars Explained Help us caption & translate this video!


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Why are there stocks at all? Everyday in the news we hear about the stock exchange, stocks and money moving around the globe. Still, a lot of people don't have an idea why we have stock markets at all, because the topic is usually very dry. We made a short video about the basics of the stock exchanges. With robots. Robots are kewl! Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, the Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! How the Stock Exchange works Help us caption & translate this video!


Black holes. Lets talk about them. Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff: Get the music of the video here: Wakelet: Or follow us on social media or reddit: Help us caption & translate this video!


The universe is unbelievably big – trillions of stars and even more planets. Soo… there just has to be life out there, right? But where is it? Why don’t we see any aliens? Where are they? And more importantly, what does this tell us about our own fate in this gigantic and scary universe? Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. You can get the music for the video here: Also, for more in depth information take a look at the WAIT BUT WHY article about Fermi Paradox: Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tony Morley, Ben Nunan, Sam Elitzer, Andrzej Rejman, Matthew Datcher, Stephen Bassett, Raphael Hviding, Jeff Le, Nat Ryall, Nicholas Holtz, Arnas, Francesca Monteiro, Duncan Cheong, Derek, James Craver, Juan Manuel Corredor, Osric Lord-Williams, Broderick, Maarten Bremer, Nat Thomas Golder, Scott Zell, John Green, AgentK, Carly Tawse, Chris Simpson, Ngo Vo Hoang Viet, [ K A I ] = 石 : :, Taylor Hadden, Chris Linardos, tekbit, Kirstie, Richard Reynolds, Jeroen Koerts, Alex Kaplan, Patrick Eyrich, Cody, KokLiang Lim, Okan, Sasha C, Marcelo, Dean Herbert, trefmanic, Adam Smith, Anton Efimenko, Gaëtan Duvaux, Rachel Proctor, Lukas Grossar, Sam Pottinger, Michal, Caroline Andrewes, Tom Alexander Kutil, Justin Bull, Ivin spates, Sebastian Laiseca, Adam Dunlap, Chase, Marius Apalseth, Daniel and Sigrid C, Volodymyr Khomenko, Cerlinfia Chen, Chris Wills, Peter Emelone, Alexandre C, Radek Falhar, Michael Slade, Miranda Willan, Alexander Heavens, Mark Govea, Andrew Knudson, Fluffy19, Adam Primaeros, Aaron, Alexander Ahn, Daniel Jones, Adamliu, Sara Shah, Jan Schmid, Susan Love, Ghitea Andrei Paul, Harry Brisson, Stian Bluth Levik, maarten ligtenberg, Larry Bunyard, Ryan, Ann, Josh Maleszewski, Matthew Russell, Veselin Kostadinov, Dario Wünsch, Eli Fisker, Daniel McCouid-Carr, Dennis van Ruijven, Ryan A. Schauer, Nikki Toss, Pierre Lacasse, Gustavo, Albert Z, Theo Alves Monteiro, Stephen Morris, Tony Montuori, Muath, David Davenport-Firth, Edgar Duarte Ortega, Stephen Chen, Christian Fernandez, Alipasha Sadri, Matthew Sample, Hamad, Mikel De Uranga, Kevin P, Steven Ratner, Eric, Andrew Connor, Bruce low, José, Wesley Sheridan Montgomery, Philipp Weber, Brad Wardell, Vaelohs, Brandon Liu, Alexander Scheffer, Peter Schuller, Eric Austin, Alexander Kosenkov, Enrico, Markus Wolski, Tim, Scott Laing, Ignacio Flores, Gizem Gürkan, Philipi Adolfo Willemann, George Chearswat, The Partisan Pundits, Matthew Gill, oscar gautama, Artem Anchugov, Bruno Araújo, Lethargicpanda, Erven, varinder singh bal, Minghan Ko, Carlos Bohorquez, Mark Scheurwater, Rob PT, Collin Banko, Arrngrim, David Harbinson, Rikard Nyberg, Jordan Rutherford, Victor, Florian Guitton, Jezariael Demos, Ajay Shekhar, Martin Fink-Jensen, Josh Allen, Nick Yonge, Karl Snickars, Jennifer Hiller, Zr4g0n, Jon Moroney, Eugene Cham, Ryan, David Garcia Quintas, somersault18:24, Renaud Savignard, Ben Shackman, James, Viktor Asklund, Elchus, Hugo, Amdrew, Pranab Shenoy, Javier de la Garza, Yannick, Terry Lipstein, Mike Horner, Laurence Dixon, Russell McCallion, Jeff Churchill, Tim Carll, Daniel, Seona Tea, Jan Berdel, Ugurcan Kutluoglu, Morten, Sieglinde Geisel, Jeff, Finn Edwards, Dylan, Philly Cashion, Colin Palin, Clayton Fussell, Daniel Gonzalez, Denis Smajlovic, Ryan Deschamps, Dan Q, Gabriel Tougas, Fabricio Godoy, Charles Kuang, Damian Johnson, Brandon Helvie, Alex Thaler, Maximilian Ritter, Ernst, Yousif, Jesse Powell, David Taylor, Mehmet Sevil, 冠瑋 陳, Jesse MacLean, Wei Wong, Matt Collins, Jon Davis, Doc Matthews, Tori McClanahan, Dan Treasure, nga⁴, Carlos García Rojas, Igor Benicio de Mesquita, Nate Rice, Sergio Uribe, Praveen Muthu, Greeny Liu, Malthe Agger, Bahjat, Tibor Schiemann, Josh Yates-Walker, dante harper, Mike Mintz, Bünyamin Tetik, Joe Pond, Steffen Weng, Lars Vas Dias, Bruno Deschatelets, Massimiliano Cacciotti The Fermi Paradox — Where Are All The Aliens? Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: Taking that internship in a remote mountain lab might not have been the best idea. Pulling that lever with the skull symbol just to see what it did probably wasn’t so smart either. But now is not the time for regrets because you need to get away from these mutant zombies.fast. Can you use math to get you and your friends over the bridge before the zombies arrive? Alex Gendler shows how. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.


What if there is a way to destroy the universe so fundamentally that life as we know it will be impossible forever? Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: band camp: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: kurzgesagtismyinspiration , Diego Espinosa, Marcus Rudd, Nur Diana, Steven Magee, Shaun Thornhill, Edward Wright, Martin Olesen, Daniel Rinfret, Tim, Project e-NEU, Lomky, roland rauch, Sven Drapeau-Martin, Randy Juip, Rowdy, Oscar Roa, Jason Lopez, Samuel Bohler, Rani Ji, Donald Dahlin, Dane R. Dickey, Tushar Sharma, David Beitler, Kasturi Raghavan, Ken, Patrick Powers, Duncan Holland, Jack Burke, Louie Guan, Brandon Cassata, Abhijay Murugesan, Stephan D’Aoust, Alexander Gonzalez, Vangar Shriek, Kirk McVean, Perry Piper, Abdulrahman Al-Khalifi, Miles Coe, Fabian Löschner, Július Retzer, Neil French, Josh Bautista, Sukhkaran Multani, Idea180, Boyd Nakamura, Royi Mindel, Rossi Davide, Alexander, Jean-Roger Caron-Ma, Brandon Meador, Ben Knight, Michael Niella, Grant Jacobson, Stuart Cass, Salva Carrión, Byron Kim, Jordan Korn, Romain Esteban, Ivan Šandrk, Alexander Schelhase,Liz A, Rebecca Edelman, Joakim Andersson, Daniel Bade, Real Engineering, Alex, Scott Tonne, Jens Bilanz, Daniel Avar, Amr Alhalabi, FURTHER READING: Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: You and nine other individuals have been captured by super-intelligent alien overlords. The aliens think humans look quite tasty, but their civilization forbids eating highly logical and cooperative beings. Unfortunately, they’re not sure whether you qualify, so they decide to give you all a test. Can you solve this hat riddle? Alex Gendler shows how. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.


How does Fusion Energy work and is it a good idea? Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: bandcamp: facebook.com/epicmountainmusic THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Sergio Galashyn, Stephen Ramwell, Mike Szörnyi, Daniel Stanley, William Harrison, Bosse25cm, Proto Sac, SH, Karp The Mad, Ryan Webster, Ugûr Yilmaz, Linden Mueller-Wong, Gleb Pereyaslavsky, Benjamin Noggle, Michael white, Jimmy Noter, Tanner Hicks, Cheng Chua, Vadim Moskalenko, Victor Labiles, Sean Esopenko, Matt Meadows, Louige Oliver, XEridaniTribalX, Gemma Toner, Thomas Boogert, Steven Brunwasser, Robert G, Tadhg O’Higgings, Miles Webb, Danni, Fabrizio Rocca, Vaclav Vyskocil, Lukas Dvoracek, Jack Burke, James Runswick, Anders Grahn, Luis Alonzo, Fabiola Garay, Matthew Waddell, Evgeni Kuneva, Russel Myers, Mohamed Almatroushi, Hemelton el Capitan, Tri Nguyen, Anton Gres, Jeremy Mint, Robert Brown, Ernest Ho, Pauilius Mikulskis, Nicolas Villanueva, Chris Roadfeldt, Joshua Mitchell, tuo tsui, Andrzej Pa, Chris Connett, Dani Donovan, Yves Guillon Khoy, OSW Review, Stephan Huerholz, Moritz Lesche, Anat Tenenbaum, Martin Kärgell, Taylor Cox, Rainer Wagner, Patrick Sweetman, Julia Casey, Jonas Gößling, Marco Moretti Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by TED-Ed.


Discuss this video: Music: Watch the other part: - Mark Govea - Wenhao Nie - Thomas J Miller Jr MD - dedla - Robert Kunz - Daniel Slater - Saki Comandao - PervertedThomas - John Buchan - Christian Cooper - Michael Little - Ripta Pasay - Andres Villacres - rictic - Ian - Faust Fairbrook - Jason Lewandowski - Michael Mrozek - Jordan LeDoux - Chris Woodall - Nevin Spoljaric - Richard Jenkins - Chris Chapin - ChoiceMechanicalDenver.com - سليمان العقل - Tony DiLascio - Chang Wang - Kozo Ota - Tod Kurt - Phil Gardner - Jordan Melville - Martin - Steven Grimm - Joe Pantry - Benjamin Morrison - Amandeep Hayer - Splendide - Ron Bowes - Tómas Árni Jónasson - Mikko - Derek Bonner - Derek Jackson - Orbit_Junkie - Colin Millions - Muhammad Shifaz - Jim - Mark Elders - Glennon B. Nelson IV - Chris Harshman - Jose Reyes - Guillermo - Veronica Peshterianu - Paul Tomblin - Travis Wichert - chrysilis - Ryan E Manning - Erik Parasiuk - Rhys Parry - Maarten van der Blij - Kevin Anderson - Kyle Bloom - David - Ryan Nielsen - Esteban Santana Santana - Dag Viggo Lokøen - Tristan Watts-Willis - John Rogers - Leon - ken mcfarlane - Brandon Callender - Timothy Moran - Peter Lomax - Emil - Tijmen van Dien - ShiroiYami - Alex Schuldberg - Ryan Constantin - Bear - Jacob Ostling - Solon Carter - Joel Wunderle - Rescla - GhostDivision - Andrew Proue - Tor Henrik Lehne - David Palomares - Cas Eliëns - Freddi Hørlyck - David Michaels - Ernesto Jimenez - Linh - Osric Lord-Williams - Ryan - Maxime Zielony - Lachlan Holmes - John Lee - Ian N Riopel - AUFFRAY Clement - Ilan - John Bevan - Timothy Basanov Music by:


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What is something? On the most fundamental level thinkable, what are things? Why are things? And why do things behave the way they do? Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff (and get cool wallpapers): Get the music of the video here: Or follow us on social media or reddit: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tamago231, H.H. Lewis, Kirin Tantinon, David, Max Lesterhuis, Marek Belski, Gisle, Colin Millions, Gregory Wolfe II, Lenoir Preminger, Abel X, Matt Knights, Amjad Al Taleb, Ian Bruce, Kris Wolfgramm, 麒麟 于, Christopher Shaw, 靖羊, Tomas Grolmus, Essena O’Neill, Kyle Messner, Pedro Devoto, Mark Radford, Ann-Marie Denham, Davide Pluda, Rik Vermeer, Justin Ritchie, Nicole White, Whireds, Claus Vallø, Jason Talley, Andrew Wu, Christian Dechery, Michael Howell, Michal Hanus, Cavit, Amary Wenger, JDKBot, Jason Eads, FreedomEagleAmerica, Roberto Maddaloni, TiagoF11, Harsha CS, Abhimanyu Yadav, Tracy Tobkin, Mike Fuchs, Elizabeth Mart, Jacob Wenger, Jeff Udall, Ricardo Affonso, Mauro Boffardi, Audrin Navarro, Troy Ross, Keith Tims, Santiago Perez, James, Jack Devlin, Chris Peters, Kenny Martin, Frederick Pickering, Lena Savelyeva, Ian Seale, Charles Ju, Brett Haugen, David Ramsey, Benjamin Dittes, Michelle Schoen, Albert Harguindey Sanchez, Michael King, Alex Kyriacou Alla Khvatova Thomas Rowan, Siim Sillamaa, David Bennell, Janzen,Bryn Farnsworth, Adam Recvlohe, Manuel Arredondo, Fred McIntyre, Maldock Manrique, Дмитрий, Ishita Bisht, Jake Ludwig, Zach Seggie, Casey Sloan, Myndert Papenhuyzen, rheingold3, AncientCulture, Orion Mondragon, Jan, Michael Kuperman, Alexander Argyropoulos What is something? Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: Mastering any physical skill takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. But what does practice actually do to make us better at things? Annie Bosler and Don Greene explain how practice affects the inner workings of our brains. Lesson by Annie Bosler and Don Greene, animation by Martina Meštrović.


View full lesson: When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What's going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians' brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout. Lesson by Anita Collins, animation by Sharon Colman Graham.


Official Discussion on Special thanks: McSteed TV: Scott Weinberg: @ryannamba tfpauly Martin Fixman Yhson44 Gidister Tom Jefferson Lisa Lyons @thesteveewin Chris Vogt Sebastián Andreas Margery Monge Jordan Hunter Jackson Nary Weis Dan Lapsley Audrius Zujus Ian Holliday Chris Farquhar Becca Rickwood Sean Murphy @seanbob4444 on twitter! Nicholas Hartikainen Timothy LaDuca ESKN Racketen Don C Ludtke @donludtke Alex Quinn Colby Patterson Jordan Hunter Jackson Richard Williams @simoneconnola Clay Compton Alex (NegativeZer0) Perelgut


For more on spin, check out: This video was supported by TechNYou: A quantum computer works in a totally different way from a classical computer. Quantum bits or 'qubits' can exist in a superposition state of both zero and one simultaneously. This means that a set of two qubits can be in a superposition of four states, which therefore require four numbers to uniquely identify the state. So the amount of information stored in N qubits is two to the power of N classical bits. Thank you to Andrea Morello and UNSW. For more info, check out:


View full lesson: Sometimes, against a uniform, bright background such as a clear sky or a blank computer screen, you might see things floating across your field of vision. What are these moving objects, and how are you seeing them? Michael Mauser explains the visual phenomenon that is floaters. Lesson by Michael Mauser, animation by Reflective Films.


View full lesson: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle states that you can never simultaneously know the exact position and the exact speed of an object. Why not? Because everything in the universe behaves like both a particle and a wave at the same time. Chad Orzel navigates this complex concept of quantum physics. Lesson by Chad Orzel, animation by Henrik Malmgren.


View full lesson: They’re cute, they’re lovable, and judging by the 26 billion views on over 2 million YouTube videos of them, one thing is certain: cats are very entertaining. But their strange feline behaviors, both amusing and baffling, leave many of us asking: Why do cats do that? Tony Buffington explains the science behind some of your cat’s strangest behaviors. Lesson by Tony Buffington, animation by Chintis Lundgren.


View full lesson: What trials unite not only Harry Potter or Frodo Baggins but many of literature's most interesting heroes? And what do ordinary people have in common with these literary heroes? Matthew Winkler takes us step-by-step through the crucial events that make or break a hero. Lesson by Matthew Winkler, animation by Kirill Yeretsky.


Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory. The discovery, made by Kuo and his colleagues at the BICEP2 experiment, represents the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the first tremors of the Big Bang. Producer: Bjorn Carey Video: Kurt Hickman For more on the discovery, see:


View full lesson: Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, posed this famous question: If you put a cat in a sealed box with a device that has a 50% chance of killing the cat in the next hour, what will be the state of the cat when that time is up? Chad Orzel investigates this thought experiment. Lesson by Chad Orzel, animation by Agota Vegso.


Made for ABC TV Catalyst as an extended version of my Comparing Temperatures video:


What causes addiction? Easy, right? Drugs cause addiction. But maybe it is not that simple. This video is adapted from Johann Hari's New York Times best-selling book 'Chasing The Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs.' For more information, and to take a quiz to see what you know about addiction, go to Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff: Get the music of the video here: An interactive version of this video: (works on mobile) Or follow us on social media or reddit: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: T0T0S, Ryan OHoro, Matthieu de Canteloube, Vince, Thomas Shiels, Brian David Henderson, Jim Yang, Arnav Guleria, Clemens, Tahseen Mushtaque, Jochen, Vahur S, Harry, BurmansHealthShop, Nils Caspar, Holger Fassel, Jackson R Hanna, Pascal de Reuck, ByeongWook Lee, Guus Ketelings, Franko Papić, Thalia, Narat, Suchartsunthorn, Lorenz Zahn, Brian Aparicio, Jörg Vogelsang, Rashed Ali, Darwin Ranzone, Tyler Thornton, David Pfister, Han Saini, Ute Moll, Ioanna Bischinioti, Jenny Zhou, Vince Babbra. Avi Yashchin, Dan Cortes, Matt K, Phiroze Dalal, Marcelo Fernandes de Souza Filho, A La Mode, Tom Wardrop, Shawn Marincas, Pontus Attåsen, Paul, Marc Dumont, Robert McKone, Todd Binkley, Matthew von der Ahe, Thomas Russell, Erick, Vivek Kotecha, Artur Szczypta, Jeff Fellows, Daniel Duffee, Konstantin Shabashov, Tim drake, Mike Galles, Evgenia Yigitalieva, Vrm Vee Are Em, Timothy Noble Everything We Think We Know About Addiction Is Wrong Help us caption & translate this video!


Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of grit as a predictor of success. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


Does quantum entanglement make faster-than-light communication possible? What is NOT random? First, I know this video is not easy to understand. Thank you for taking the time to attempt to understand it. I've been working on this for over six months over which time my understanding has improved. Quantum entanglement and spooky action at a distance are still debated by professors of quantum physics (I know because I discussed this topic with two of them). Does hidden information (called hidden variables by physicists) exist? If it does, the experiment violating Bell inequalities indicates that hidden variables must update faster than light - they would be considered 'non-local'. On the other hand if you don't consider the spins before you make the measurement then you could simply say hidden variables don't exist and whenever you measure spins in the same direction you always get opposite results, which makes sense since angular momentum must be conserved in the universe. Everyone agrees that quantum entanglement does not allow information to be transmitted faster that light. There is no action either detector operator could take to signal the other one - regardless of the choice of measurement direction, the measured spins are random with 50/50 probability of up/down. Special thanks to: Prof. Stephen Bartlett, University of Sydney: Prof. John Preskill, Caltech: Looking Glass Universe: Physics Girl: MinutePhysics: Community Channel: Nigel, Helen, Luke, and Simon for comments on earlier drafts of this video. Filmed in part by Scott Lewis: Music by Amarante One Last Time :


Every second of your life you are under attack. Bacteria, viruses, spores and more living stuff wants to enter your body and use its resources for itself. The immune system is a powerful army of cells that fights like a T-Rex on speed and sacrifices itself for your survival. Without it you would die in no time. This sounds simple but the reality is complex, beautiful and just awesome. An animation of the immune system. We are thinking of making an App for tablets out of this video. Would you like that? Did you think the visual system we developed worked? Feedback is much appreciated! You can get the MUSIC of the video here: Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars jordan gardner Derek Loa Jeroen Koerts Carlos Campuzano Benoît Graham Scott Zell Tanya Smirnova Giovanna Cardoso Patrick Eyrich Alex Kaplan Chris Dudley Deanie Adams Caroline Andrewes Dean Herbert Rory Bennett Adam Primaeros Rasmus Lind Daniel O.C.L. Dylan Hoffer Maxl Heitsch Eliud Vasquez Neve Laughery Ghitea Andrei Paul Alexander Law McCormack Heavens Eduardo Barbosa Sara Shah Dario Pagnia Chris Doughty Evan Low Stephen Morse Bünyamin Tetik Romano Casellini dante harper Justin T. Greeny Liu Siddharth Bajaj Valerie Brunet Jen Tim Peter Wagner Yousif Efe Melih Polat Gaëtan Maximilian Ritter Charles Kuang Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Petr Pilař Finn Edwards Thomas Lee Daniel Fuchs Pascal B. Seona Tea Pol Lutgen Roman Zolotorevich Daniel Jonathan Velazquez Gore Jeff Church Churchill Randy Knapp Brandon Liu Peter Žnuderl Swarochisha Kandregula Javier de la Garza Jan Lukas Lehmann somersault18:24 Why you are still alive - The immune system explained Help us caption & translate this video!


It may not look like it sitting in that cute bear bottle, but honey is a supercharged bacteria-killing powerhouse! Learn more about hydrogen peroxide: Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Coda Buchanan, Lucy McGlasson, Accalia Elementia, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Saul, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Christopher Collins, Thomas J., charles george, Andreas Heydeck, Patrick D. Ashmore, Justin Lentz, Will and Sonja Marple, Ed Shelley, Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: ---------- Sources: a5 Images: /media/File:Pyruvaldehyde.svg


In which John Green explores F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby. John introduces you to Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy and Tom Buchanan, and the other characters in the novel, and tries to look beyond the surface story to figure out what this thing is ABOUT. Set in the 1920's against a conflicted backdrop of prohibition and excess, The Great Gatsby takes a close look at the American Dream as it existed in Fitzgerald's time. It turns out, it had a lot to do with money and status, and it still does today. John will cover the rich symbolism of the novel, from the distant green light to the pale gold of wealth and decay. Also, Paris Hilton drops by. Turn on the captions. You'll like it. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Like us! Support CrashCourse on Patreon:


View full lesson: Perpetual motion machines — devices that can do work indefinitely without any external energy source — have captured many inventors’ imaginations because they could totally transform our relationship with energy. There’s just one problem: they don’t work. Why not? Netta Schramm describes the pitfalls of perpetual motion machines. Lesson by Netta Schramm, animation by TED-Ed.


How do you measure big forces accurately? By calibrating your force transducer on the world's biggest weight - 1,000,000 pounds of force. This machine ensures planes don't break apart, jets provide required thrust, and rockets make it to their destination. Thanks to the people at NIST for showing me around: Rick Seifarth and Ben Stein. Animations here are by Sean Kelley and additional footage by Jennifer Lauren Lee. Special thanks to Patreon Supporters: Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Jeff Straathof, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal, Nathan Hansen Support Veritasium on Patreon: Before visiting NIST in Washington DC I had no idea machines like this existed. Surely there's an accurate way to measure forces without creating such a huge known force?! Nope. This appears to be the best way, with a stack of 20 x 50,000 lb masses creating a maximum force of 4.45 MN or 1,000,000 pounds of force. I also wouldn't have thought about all the corrections that need applying - for example buoyancy subtracts about 125 pounds from the weight of the stack. Plus the local gravitational field strength must be taken into account. And, the gravitational field varies below grade. All of this must be taken into account in order to limit uncertainty to just five parts per million (.0005%) Music from The Epidemic Sound Serene Story 2


My entry to the techNyou Science Ambassadors competition, visit and to find out more about these guys.


Drawing from some of the most pivotal points in his life, Steve Jobs, chief executive officer and co-founder of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, urged graduates to pursue their dreams and see the opportunities in life's setbacks -- including death itself -- at the university's 114th Commencement on June 12, 2005. Transcript of Steve Jobs' address: Stanford University channel on YouTube:


View full lesson: Without water, a human can only survive for about 100 hours. But there’s a creature so resilient that it can go without it for decades. This 1-millimeter animal can survive both the hottest and coldest environments on earth, and can even withstand high levels of radiation. Thomas Boothby introduces us to the tardigrade, one of the toughest creatures on Earth. Lesson by Thomas Boothby, animation by Boniato Studio.


View full lesson: Physicist Werner Heisenberg said, “When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first.” As difficult as turbulence is to understand mathematically, we can use art to depict the way it looks. Natalya St. Clair illustrates how Van Gogh captured this deep mystery of movement, fluid and light in his work. Lesson by Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer.


View full lesson: The Infinite Hotel, a thought experiment created by German mathematician David Hilbert, is a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Easy to comprehend, right? Wrong. What if it's completely booked but one person wants to check in? What about 40? Or an infinitely full bus of people? Jeff Dekofsky solves these heady lodging issues using Hilbert's paradox. Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.


NOTE: This video will appear in a playlist on Smarter Every Day hence the references to Veritasium. Destin does lots of cool science stuff - check out his channel if you haven't already We have been collaborating on rotational motion, which is timely for some of the videos I've been doing lately. In this video I talk about gyroscopic precession - the wobbling of a spinning top around its axis. This is caused by the torque due to the object's weight. The big idea is that the torque vector increases angular momentum in the direction of torque. So if there is no angular momentum initially, it will cause the system to swing in such a direction that it is rotating with new angular momentum in the direction of the torque. However, if there was angular momentum to begin with, the torque will change the direction of that angular momentum by causing precession.


Automation in the Information Age is different. Books we used for this video: The Rise of the Robots: The Second Machine Age: Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Robot Poster & Kurzgesagt merch here: The music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: – Study about job automation in the next two decades: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Brandon Eversole, Andrew Anglehart, Christian Ahlin, Kathleen Woolum, Estel Anahmias, Adam Schlender, Mike Luque, Encyclo, Stevie Taylor, Brent Yoder, Invisibleman, Jeff Lam, Christopher Hayes, Oliver Walker, gwendolyn bellermann, Matt Logan, Philip Chou, Brandon Young, Arlo Stewart, Thomas Hodnemyr, Viachaslau Hurmanau, Sam Cousins, Robin Hultgren, Jose Schroeder, Ched, Claustrophobya, Charles Wang, Dolan Dark, Casaro, Donglin Li, Sarah Thompson, Pamela Palmer, Fergal Harrington, Jonas Erath, Spencer, Zsuzsi Balai, Tyler Roberts, Allyssa Blalock, Robert Bishop, Carl-Johan Linde, Thomas Nielsen, Heather Pray, Marco Boneberger, Mehsotopes, Joe Johnston, ugo dubois, Keagan Boys, Miles Gard, Frantisek Sumsala, Scott, Tobias Theobald, Solar3ty Games, Nicholas Carr, K41N_of_2358, Daniel RodrÌguez, Pixlpit, Gytis Kirvela, Thomas Flanigan, Dwagon, Costin Graur, Mavis Everett, Kwiatkowski Robert, Huo Benpeng, Dan Gretton, Joshua Davison, Bryce Comp, Andrey Lipattsev, DEFECT DAVIS, Gurleen Saini, Andrew FastLizard4 Adams, Isak Hietala, Leon Han, Sarah Johnson, Kieran Chakravorty, Hanna Khoury, Kimberly Martin, Jon Glass, Julius Wroblewski, Ben Zautner, Kester Falge, Juan Florez, Tad Moore Help us caption & translate this video! The Rise of the Machines – Why Automation is Different This time


In a very short amount of time the human population exploded and is still growing very fast. Will this lead to the end of our civilization? Check out by Max Roser! Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: Facebook: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Stuart Alldritt, Tasia Pele, Stan Serebryakov, Mike Janzen, Jason Heddle, August, Daniel Smith, Jonathan Herman, Rahul Rachuri, Piotr Gorzelany, Lisa Allcott, Горан Гулески, Eric Ziegast, Kean Drake, Friendly Stranger, NicoH, Adrian Rutkiewicz, Markus Klemm, Leandro Nascimento, Gary Chan, Shawhin Layeghi, Oscar Hernandez, Dale Prinsse, Vaclav Vyskocil, Sup3rW00t, Ryan Coonan, Tam Lerner, Dewi Cadat, Luis Aguirre, Andy McVey, Vexorum, Boris, Adam Wisniewski, Yannic Schreiber, Erik Lilly, Ellis, Dmitry Starostin, Akshay Joshi, Peter Tinti, kayle Clark, Mortimer Brewster, Marc Legault, Sumita Pal, Tarje Hellebust Jr., streetdragon95, Taratsamura, Sam Dickson, Bogdan Firicel, Saul Vera, Aaron Jacobs, Ben Arts, R B Dean, Kevin Beedon, Patrik Pärkinen, Duncan Graham, Johan Thomsen, Emily Tran, Adam Flanc, Adam Jermyn, Ali Uluyol Help us caption & translate this video! Overpopulation – The Human Explosion Explained


In a zero-g plane I experimented with flames and slinkies with surprising results. Check out e-penser's video: Check out Physicsgirl's video: Thanks to Novespace: Special thanks to Patreon Supporters: Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Nick Luchsinger, Jeff Straathof, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal, Nathan Hansen The zero-g plane allows for a lot of experiments to be conducted without the expense of getting equipment into orbit. Apparently 80% of microgravity research can be performed in a zero-gravity plane, which is much cheaper than going to space. The flame from the lighter seemed much lazier in zero-g because without weight there is no buoyant force and therefore no convection. This makes the process of combustion more challenging because it's difficult for oxygen to reach the fuel. Music from the Epidemic Sound: Serene Story 2 In Orbit 2


View full lesson: When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine -- an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. Lesson by Nicole Avena, animation by STK Films.


Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, They don't pay me to like the kids. Her response: Kids don't learn from people they don't like.' A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


View full lesson: If you can’t imagine life without chocolate, you’re lucky you weren’t born before the 16th century. Until then, chocolate only existed as a bitter, foamy drink in Mesoamerica. So how did we get from a bitter beverage to the chocolate bars of today? Deanna Pucciarelli traces the fascinating and often cruel history of chocolate. Lesson by Deanna Pucciarelli, animation by TED-Ed.


View full lesson: Sitting down for brief periods can help us recover from stress or recuperate from exercise. But nowadays, our lifestyles make us sit much more than we move around. Are our bodies built for such a sedentary existence? Murat Dalkilinç investigates the hidden risks of sitting down. Lesson by Murat Dalkilinç, animation by Oxbow Creative.


View full lesson: View all the clues here: digdeeper Before he turned physics upside down, a young Albert Einstein supposedly showed off his genius by devising a complex riddle involving a stolen exotic fish and a long list of suspects. Can you resist tackling a brain teaser written by one of the smartest people in history? Dan Van der Vieren shows how. Lesson by Dan Van der Vieren, animation by Artrake Studio.


A head-vaporizing laser with a perfect wavelength detecting sub-proton space-time ripples. Huge thanks to Prof Rana Adhikari and LIGO: Here's how he felt when he learned about the first ever detection: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal Support Veritasium on Patreon: A lot of videos have covered the general overview of the discovery of gravitational waves, what they are, the history of the search, when they were found but I wanted to delve into the absurd science that made the detection possible. When scientists want one megawatt of laser power, it's not just for fun (though I'm sure it's that too), it's because the fluctuations in the number of photons is proportional to their square root, making more powerful beams less noisy (as a fraction of their total). The smoothest mirrors were created not for aesthetic joy but because when you're trying to measure wiggles that are a fraction the width of a proton, a rough mirror surface simply won't do. Filmed by Daniel Joseph Files Music by Kevin MacLeod, Black Vortex (appropriately named) Music licensed from Epidemic Sound Observations 2 (also appropriately named)


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